Winnie the Pooh Day 🍯

“A day without a friend is like a pot without a single drop of honey left inside.” ~ Winnie the Pooh

Winnie the Pooh Day was created to celebrate the creator’s birthday, A.A. Milne. Milne was born on this day in 1882 in London, England. Milne brought this adorable, honey-loving, bear to life in his writings in a collection of books first published in 1926.

Milne’s lovable Pooh Bear is a fictional bear inspired by a black bear named Winnie who lived at the London Zoo during World War I. The author’s son, Christopher Robin, would visit the bear often at the zoo and named his own teddy bear after her.

Milne created other characters in these books, Tigger, Piglet, Eeyore, Kanga, and Roo, after his son’s other stuffed animals.

I so remember enjoying Winne the Pooh as a young girl and love seeing my own children enjoy these lovable characters.

Winnie the Pooh continues today to inspire and entertain many fans throughout the world.

To celebrate this fun day, go and enjoy a Winne the Pooh book, enjoy some honey, snuggle one of your stuffed animals, host a picnic, draw your house in the woods, or even bounce around the room a bit. 😉

“It never hurts to keep looking for sunshine.” ~ Winnie the Pooh ☀️

😍❤️🍯

Happy Birthday, Jane Austen!

Jane Austen was born on December 16, 1775 in England.  She authored six books and these books continue to be revered today. Her books include Pride and Prejudice, Emma, Sense and Sensibility, Persuasion, Northanger Abbey, and Mansfield Park.

Jane’s father encouraged her writing back then and even bought her expensive paper and pencils even when the family needed the extra money. She used her father’s library frequently by reading lots of books.

I distinctly remember reading Pride and Prejudice many, many years ago. I loved that book! I dreamt about meeting my own Mr. Darcy some day. But, I also remember Jane’s great sense of wit and wisdom in her writing throughout her novels.

Enjoy a few quotes from Jane Austen’s works:

“It isn’t what we say or think that defines us, but what we do.”
Sense and Sensibility

“I declare after all there is no enjoyment like reading! How much sooner one tires of any thing than of a book! — When I have a house of my own, I shall be miserable if I have not an excellent library.”
Pride and Prejudice

“The person, be it gentleman or lady, who has not pleasure in a good novel, must be intolerably stupid.”
Northanger Abbey 

“Vanity and pride are different things, though the words are often used synonymously. A person may be proud without being vain. Pride relates more to our opinion of ourselves, vanity to what we would have others think of us.”
Pride and Prejudice

To celebrate her birthday, go out and read (or reread) one of her great books!

 

Dewey Decimal Day

Happy Dewey Decimal System Day!

Melvil Dewey was born on this day in 1851. In 1873, he invented the most widely used library classification system called the Dewey Decimal System. It is used in more than 140 countries and translated into more than 30 different languages.

The system places the books on the shelf by subject using numbers from 000 to 999. It is called “Decimal” because it uses numbers to the right of the decimal point for more detail. Each subject has its own set of numbers.

dewey_books

For fun, I looked up my thesis book at my university’s library and it’s number is 361.4 A756a1999.   😉

Next time you’re at the library, check out the call number on your book and know that this system was created back in 1873!

 

National Author’s Day

Happy National Author’s Day!  Today celebrates American authors and the books they write.

Some records show that in 1928, Nellie Verne Burt McPherson had an idea of setting aside a day to celebrate American authors. McPherson wrote a fan letter to fiction writer, Irving Bacheller, telling him how much she enjoyed reading his story. Upon receiving her letter, Bacheller sent her an autographed copy of another story.  McPerson decided to show her appreciation by submitting an idea for a National Author’s Day to the General Federation of Women’s Clubs. They passed a resolution declaring November 1 as a day to honor American writers.

About 20 years later, the United States Department of Commerce recognized this day in 1949 and we have celebrated it since then.

So, celebrate authors today by purchasing one of their books or checking one out of the library. You can also write (or tweet) them a thank you for their stories.

Secret

I have a secret. It isn’t your normal type of a secret. And it’s not going to put me in jail type of secret. I’ll share my little secret with you all as it seems fitting here in this blog. So, I really love volcanoes. I am completely fascinated by them! (I warned you that it isn’t a normal type of secret!)

I really don’t know where this fascination of volcanoes came from as I grew up in the Midwest. It’s as flat as a pancake there with no volcanoes anywhere near there.

Maybe it all stems from Mount St. Helens. I vividly remember seeing the television footage of Mount St. Helens’ eruption on May 18, 1980. And then, after nine hours of eruption, the mountain and landscape looked so different.

Sometime after that eruption, my dad traveled out west for work and brought me back a little box of ashes from Mount St. Helens. I thought that was so cool! And I still have the box.

Volcanoes came back into my interest as an adult after traveling to several national parks. Did you know that there are at least 38 national parks and monuments in the United States that have volcanoes has a central theme or a major supporting role?

I remember sitting at my first park ranger program at Yellowstone National Park listening about the fact that Yellowstone is a supervolcano*. I had no idea at the time! I don’t remember learning anything about that in my high school earth science class. Yellowstone has had three super eruptions in the last two million years and it is just sleeping and will erupt again someday.

While the roots of volcanoes are underground, you can see the features of the volcanic activity of Yellowstone all over the park – geysers, hot springs, mudpots, fumaroles, travertine terraces, craters, Red Mountains, and more.

Old Faithful

After learning all about Yellowstone, I had to read more about volcanoes. I had to learn more them. I also wanted to visit more volcanic national parks or monuments. It is one thing to read about it, but so different to actually see an active mountain, sleeping area, craters, or other volcanic features in person.

I learned more than the science though from visiting the national parks. I realized the power and also the fragility of nature. Our national parks and their amazing and unique features impact us often beyond our visits there.

Maybe I should have been a volcanologist! 😉

*A supervolcano refers to a volcano capable of an eruption more than 240 cubic miles of magma. Translation = it is HUGE!

Happy Dictionary Day!

Happy Dictionary Day!

dictionary

Today celebrates the birthday of Noah Webster born on today in 1758. Noah Webster is considered to be the Father of the American Dictionary. The objective of this day is to emphasize the importance of dictionary skills and to improve vocabulary.

To honor this fun day, pick up a dictionary and find a new word or two to learn today!

Happy reading and learning!